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Walk the Boardwalk


Mill Creek Park is a good start to your new path on a healthier outlook. Start your journey at www.millcreekmetroparks.org.

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Mission of the Youngstown City Health District

Our mission is to protect and improve the public health of the local community.

Here at the Youngstown City Health District, we are committed to enable all of the citizens of Youngstown and its surrounding areas which we serve, to engage in healthful and preventive behaviors.

We will strive to achieve and sustain optimal levels of physical and environmental health which will be accomplished by our highly motivated staff. Our staff will responsibly maximize our resources to provide ongoing education, and the development and coordination of programs which are sensitive to the people and the needs of the public.

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Local News

Turkey Basics: Safe Cooking

A food thermometer should be used to ensure a safe minimum internal temperature of 165 °F has been reached to destroy bacteria and prevent foodborne illness.





Many variables can affect the roasting time of a whole turkey:

A partially frozen turkey requires longer cooking.

  • A stuffed turkey takes longer to cook.
  • The oven may heat food unevenly.
  • Temperature of the oven may be inaccurate.
  • Dark roasting pans cook faster than shiny metals.
  • The depth and size of the pan can reduce heat circulation to all areas of the turkey.
  • The use of a foil tent for the entire time can slow cooking.
  • Use of the roasting pan's lid speeds cooking.
  • An oven cooking bag can accelerate cooking time.
  • The rack position can have an effect on even cooking and heat circulation.
  • A turkey or its pan may be too large for the oven, thus blocking heat circulation.

ROASTING INSTRUCTIONS   

1. Set the oven temperature no lower than 325 °F. Preheating is not necessary. 

2. Be sure the turkey is completely thawed. Times are based on fresh or thawed birds at a refrigerator temperature of 40 °F or below.

3. Place turkey breast-side up on a flat wire rack in a shallow roasting pan 2 to 2 1/2 inches deep. 

    Optional steps:

  • Tuck wing tips back under shoulders of bird (called "akimbo").
  • Add one-half cup water to the bottom of the pan.
  • In the beginning, a tent of aluminum foil may be placed loosely over the breast of the turkey for the first 1 to 1 1/2 hours, then removed for browning. Or, a tent of foil may be placed over the turkey after the turkey has reached the desired golden brown color.

4. For optimum safety, cook stuffing in a casserole. If stuffing your turkey, mix ingredients just before stuffing it; stuff loosely. Additional time is required for the turkey and stuffing to reach a safe minimum internal temperature (see chart).

5. For safety and doneness, the internal temperature should be checked with a food thermometer. The temperature of the turkey and the center of the stuffing must reach a safe minimum internal temperature of 165 °F. Check the temperature in the innermost part of the thigh and wing and the thickest part of the breast.

6. Let the bird stand 20 minutes before removing stuffing and carving
              

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    10 Elements of Healthy Communities

    What does it take to create and maintain a healthy community? According to the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), health care systems must perfor ten essential elements in order to create and maintain health communities. 
    1. Conducting community diagnosis
    2. Preventing and controlling epidemics
    3. Providing a safe and healthy environment
    4. Measuring performance, effectiveness and outcomes of health services
    5. Promoting healthy lifestyles
    6. Laboratory testing
    7. Providing target outreach and forming partnerships
    8. Providing personal health care services
    9. Research and innovation
    10. Mobilizing the community for action
                
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    Influenza Facts

    • An estimated 90% of seasonal flu-related deaths and more than 60% of seasonal flu-related hospitalizations in the United States each year occur in people 65 years and older.
    • People 65 years and older are at greater risk of serious complications from the flu compared with young, healthy adults so it is recommended that older adults get their flu shot.
    • Pregnant women should get a flu vaccine to protect not only themselves, but their baby, too.
    • Most healthy adults may be able to infect others beginning 1 day before symptoms develop and up to 5 to 7 days after becoming sick.
    • You should be vacccinated if you have the following medical conditios: asthma, neurological or neurodevelopmental conditions, chronic lung disease, heart disease, blood disorders, kidney or liver disorders, diabetes, metabolic disorders, weakened immune systems, or are morbily obese.
    • The single best way to prevent the flu is to get a flu vaccine each season. There are two types of flu vaccines: the flu shot and a nasal spray flu vaccine.
    • The CDC recommends that all children between the ages 6 months and 19 years get a flu vaccine.
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